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AH353: Renaissance Architecture

https://library.bu.edu/italianrenaissancearchitecture

Cited References - Articles & Books

Finding out who has referred to your article connects you to the scholarly "conversation" or discussion of the topic.  You might find articles that agree and other articles that disagree with your author's methodology, interpretation, conclusion(s), etc.  After reading a few articles and reflecting on their point of view, you will be able to draw your own conclusions and become a participant (albeit unpublished!) in the discussion.

Web of Science: Arts and Humanities Citation Index (A&HCI), Social Sciences Citation Index (SSCI) 
Cited Reference Search.  (Mack C* 1974)

Google Scholar See Cited by #.
(The Rucellai Palace: Some New Proposals)

Book Reviews

Reviews of a book can get you thinking about its author's ideas, perspective, interpretation, and presentation of a topic.  What do the author's peers think about the book and then what do you think about it? This guide will point you to places where book reviews are published and how to find them.

What Is A Book Review?

Descriptive:  Some book reviews simply describe the book.  They tell you about the book's topic if it is not evident from its title, the number of pages, and whether or not it has illustrations in black and white and/or in color, a bibliography or list of references, and perhaps its price.  They usually are quite short. Here is an example:

"REVIEW: Lillie (history of art, U. of York) challenges the urban bias in Renaissance art and architectural history by investigating the architecture and patronage strategies of the Strozzi and Sassetti clans in the Florentine countryside during the 15th century. Drawing on unpublished archival material and the study of little-known buildings, she finds a different reality than the traditional, idealized notion of the Renaissance villa. The pastoral idyll is replaced here by dilapidated houses undergoing renovation and conversion, by the nurturing of dynastic and patrimonial values, and a thrifty, utilitarian attitude toward villa life."  "Florentine Villas in the Fifteenth Century; an Architectural and Social History." Reference and Research Book News 21.4 (2006)ProQuest. Web. 31 Jan. 2019. (410 words)

 

Evaluative & Critical:  Other book reviews are written by scholars usually engaged in the same research area as the book's author.  Many of these reviews can be several pages long.  They are published in scholarly journals.

"Lillie excels at analysis of building form, architectural detail, and description of interior spaces based on estate inventories. Indeed, this book would serve as an important model were it not for one serious flaw: she has attempted to create a contextual history of the villa without availing herself of much of the recent scholarship that forms the context for villa studies. Her chosen villas are examined as though isolated from other villa cultures of the peninsula in the fifteenth century, from the larger history of villa culture dating from antiquity, and from numerous important villa studies from the past fifteen to twenty years."  Harris, D. "Review: Florentine Villas in the Fifteenth Century: An Architectural and Social History, by Amanda Lillie." Journal of the Society of Architectural Historians 66, no. 1 (2007): 112-13.

 

How to Find Book Reviews: Book reviews can be found via BULS, article databases, newspapers, publications of professional and scholarly organization, and other resources.

BULS

Step 1. In the library's online catalog, BULS, type the first few words of the book's title in the search box.).

Step 2. Sign in.  Your BU Login name/password.

Step 3.  Scroll down to Details.

Steps 4/5. Copy the title (to be sure you have the exact and complete title).

                   Paste the title in the search box.

Florentine villas in the fifteenth century : an architectural and social history

Step 6.  The first result is the book itself.
              The next results are reviews of the book in periodicals.
              Scroll down until duplicates appear.
              Can you tell from the citations which reviews are scholarly and evaluative?  Open them to find out.
              Tip:  the scholarly reviews are mainly in peer-reviewed journals!
 

Article Databases

Librarian